Friday, April 3, 2015

Writing to Listen, Play, Discover by Irene Latham

The Writer & Her Niece, Evolving at Schonbrunn
Palace in Vienna, Austria.
Aren't we continually evolving as writers?

To me, that evolution is one of the most irresistible and fulfilling things about being a writer -- the neverending learning curve, how the words change and we change, again and again, never stopping in any one place for long. For those of us with wanderlust in the bones, it's pretty much the perfect way to while away the hours!

And it's something that's been on my mind a lot in these past few months as I've journeyed through The Artist's Way by Julia Cameron -- and journeyed across Austria, Germany & Switzerland. Some of my thoughts on this came out in a blog post I did recently for Little Patuxent Review, a journal that so kindly accepted a poem of mine to include in their "Food" issue.

Here's an excerpt. I invite you to read the whole post!

"These days I reject the notion of writing poetry as my “work.” Work is something one does, an act, something outside oneself. Clock in-clock out. There is no clocking out of my poetic life. It isn’t work so much as practice. I don’t craft so much as listen, play, discover. If I could go back and tell my younger poet self one thing it would be, slow down. Pay attention. Rest. Approach the page with the reverence a bee gives an aster. The practice of writing poetry is a way to love the world – not a way to conquer it."

Also: Happy National Poetry Month! Some of my evolution is evident in once-ultra-private-writer-me posting an original poem each day this month on my blog. Holy imperfection!! I've selected works of art and will be responding to them with a focus on dialogue, conversation, what does the piece say?

Please do stop by and offer me a word of encouragement. :)

3 comments:

  1. What is ti about poetry that inspires us to be better writers? Great post Irene.

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  2. Poetry is maybe the most challenging form of all writing. Love this idea of focusing on "dialogue."

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  3. Irene! This struck home: "Approach the page with the reverence a bee gives an aster. The practice of writing poetry is a way to love the world – not a way to conquer it." This says it all. I'm so happy you had a bountiful trip and success with The Artist's Way. I, too, am a JC devotee.

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